Chrysanthemum Tea

Chrysanthemum Tea

This maybe the easiest recipe that I have ever posted, but it is too good not to be shared with you. I grew up drinking this tea. My mom always made it for my sister and I during hot summer days. When we came home from school, it was really nice to have a cup of cold sweet tea.

Chrysanthemum tea is made with dried Chrysanthemum flowers, water and sugar. It is sweet with an amazing floral scent. Light and refreshing. It is a very common and popular tea within Chinese. It is said that the tea aids in the recovery from cold and flu. It is also a cooling herb which can reduce the body temperature, which is perfect for summer time. I don’t know if Chrysanthemum tea really have any medical benefits, but it sure is a nice tea to enjoy.

One interesting side story: When I first saw the word “Chrysanthemum”, I just didn’t know how to pronounce it. Bryan repeated the word again and again, but I still couldn’t remember it. Out of nowhere, I came to realize the word “Chrysanthemum” sounds a lot like “Chris and his mom”. When you say “Chris and his mom” really fast, it would sound like “Chrysanthemum”. Ever since then, I can pronounce this word perfectly. 🙂

Last but not least, I will be taking a break and traveling, so I won’t be blogging for 3 weeks. Please check back on the week of February 9th. Meanwhile, follow me (@missinglokness) on Instagram for the latest photo updates. Stay tune!

Chrysanthemum Tea2

Chrysanthemum Tea

2 large serving cups

Ingredients:

–   4 cups water

–   2 ounces rock sugar

–   20 – 25 pieces dried chrysanthemum

Directions:

  1. In a small pot over high heat, bring the water to boil. Add the rock sugar and cook until the sugar has melted, stirring occasionally. Add the dried flowers. Cover with a lid and turn off the heat.
  2. If you would like to drink the tea right away, serve immediately after 5-minute of steeping.
  3. For storage, let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Remove the flowers. Let the tea cool to room temperature. Transfer to a container and keep in fridge. It can be stored for 2 days.
  4. You can either drink it cold or you can reheat in the microwave for a hot drink.

Tips:

  1. Rock sugar can be found in most Asian supermarkets, like 99 Ranch Market. If you can’t find it, you can use regular sugar, but probably not 2 ounces. Taste and adjust to your liking.
  2. I bought my dried chrysanthemum from a Taiwanese tea store, Tea Station in San Gabriel, Los Angeles. You should be able to find them in online or some local tea stores. 
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11 thoughts on “Chrysanthemum Tea

  1. I love chrysanthemum tea! It was my favorite tea while I was growing up too, you reminded me that I haven’t had any in a while 🙂 Happy Chinese New Year and hope you have a wonderful trip in HK and can’t wait to hear all about it when you get back!

  2. I wrote about this during the horrible haze in Malaysia last year. You’ve reminded me that I have a pack of chrysanthemum flowers still on my counter top. Must do something with it soon! What do you say about some chrysanthemum tea jelly?

    PS: Have a great, well-deserved break! 🙂

  3. I’m more into jasmine and rose tea but This sound very calming and refreshing, I would love to try this. Happy Chinese New Year 🙂

  4. I love Chrysanthemum tea and we often choose it when we go to dim sum. I am not sure where we can get it but assume somewhere in Asian supermarket (where I have never paid attention to…). I gotta check it out. I do have rock sugar already (used for Chinese cooking before). Can’t wait to make it at home! Thank you for sharing.

    And now I remember you were going to Japan in January. I hope you’re having a great time! There are so many places to go within Tokyo! Have a safe trip. 🙂

    • I thought you have to pay extra for ordering chrysanthemum tea in dim sum places. I have to try doing that now. But yea, you should be able to find dried chrysanthemum very easy.

      Haha…. good memory! Yes, we went to Tokyo for a few days, then stayed in Hong Kong for a week or so. It was a fantastic trip. Thanks for all the tips. I will post some pictures later.

  5. Pingback: Edible Flowers | 5 Flowers You Can Eat!

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